1. Andrew Jackson’s Vision for America

Primary Source 
Two letters by Andrew Jackson:
1) Jackson, Andrew. “To John Sevier (October 9, 1803).” In Papers of Andrew Jackson, edited by Sam B. Smith and Harriet Chappell Owsley, Vol. I, 1770-1803. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1980 » Read (requires 4×4 login)
2) Jackson, Andrew. “Brave Tennesseans.” In Whig Extra. Nashville, Tenn., 1813. » Read
Secondary Source
Anderson, Fred, and Andrew Cayton. “Jackson’s Vision: Creating a Populist Empire.” In Dominion of War: Empire and Liberty in North America, 1500-2000, 207–46. New York: Viking, 2005. » Read (requires 4×4 login)

2. Slavery and the Law

Primary Source 
State v. Mann, 13 N.C. 263 (1829) » Read
Secondary Source 
Tushnet, Mark. “State v. Mann: Why Ruffin?” North Carolina Law Review 87 (2008-2009): 967-78. » Read

3. The Bank War

Primary Source 
Jackson, Andrew. “President Jackson’s Veto Message Regarding the Bank of the United States; July 10, 1832.” Avalon Project. Yale Law School. » Read
Secondary Source 
Wilson, Major L. “The ‘Country’ versus the ‘Court’: A Republican Consensus and Party Debate in the Bank War.” Journal of the Early Republic 15, no. 4 (December 1, 1995): 619–47.  » Read

4. Conflicts in Sovereignty: Tribal, State, and Federal Government

Primary Source 
Samuel Worcester, Plaintiff in Error v. The State of Georgia, 31 US 515 (1832) » Read
Secondary Source 
Miles, Edwin A. “After John Marshall’s Decision: Worcester v. Georgia and the Nullification Crisis.” The Journal of Southern History 39, no. 4 (November 1, 1973): 519–44. » Read

5. Andrew Jackson’s Justification for Indian Removal

Primary Source 
“State of the Union Address, Andrew Jackson, December 6, 1830.” The American Presidency Project. » Read
Secondary Source
Scherer, Mark. “‘Now Let Him Enforce It’: Exploring the Myth of Andrew Jackson’s Response to ’Worcester vs. Georgia (1832).” Chronicles of Oklahoma 74, no. 1 (March 1996): 16–29. » Read (requires 4×4 login)

6. Indian Removal and Anti-removal Campaigns

Primary Source 
Perdue, Theda, and Michael D. Green, eds. “Cherokee Debate / Texts of Petitions.” In Cherokee Removal : A Brief History with Documents, 2nd ed., 129–37. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005.  » Read (requires 4×4 login)
Secondary Source 
Miles, Tiya. “‘Circular Reasoning’: Recentering Cherokee Women in the Antiremoval Campaigns.” American Quarterly 61, no. 2 (2009): 221–43. » Read

7. Slavery and Abolitionism

Primary Source 
Calhoun, John C. “Slavery a Positive Good, February 6, 1837.” TeachingAmericanHistory.org. » Read  Note: For the speech and the original context of the debate see U.S. Senate, Congressional Globe, 24th Congress, 2nd Sess (Feb. 6, 1837). Choose “December 5, 1836 to March 3, 1837” and go to image 157-159.  » Read
Secondary Source 
Ford, Lacy. “Reconfiguring the Old South: ‘Solving’ the Problem of Slavery, 1787–1838.” The Journal of American History 95, no. 1 (June 1, 2008): 95–122. » Read

8. The Exercise of Control Over Enslaved Women

Primary Source
Reynolds, Mary. “Ex-Slave Stories (Texas).” Federal Writer’s Project, United States Work Projects Administration (USWPA). Library of Congress. » Read
Secondary Source
Camp, Stephanie M. H. “The Pleasures of Resistance: Enslaved Women and Body Politics in the Plantation South, 1830-1861.” The Journal of Southern History 68, no. 3 (August 1, 2002): 533–72. » Read

9. A Look Inside the Slave Trade

Primary Source 
Spirituals
A) Many Thousands Gone.” » Read
B) Been in the Storm So Long.” » Read Note: see page 12 of PDF
Secondary Source 
Johnson, Walter. “The Chattel Principle.” In Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market, 19–44. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1999. » Read

10. Working Conditions for Women in Factories

Primary Source
“First Official Investigation of Labor Conditions, 1845.” In A Documentary History of American Industrial Society: Labor Movement. A.H. Clark Company, 1910.  » Read Note: Begins on page 133
Secondary Source 
Dublin, Thomas. “Women, Work, and the Family: Female Operatives in the Lowell Mills, 1830-1860.” Feminist Studies 3, no. 1/2 (October 1, 1975): 30–39. » Read

11. Race and Racism in the Antebellum North

Primary Source
Hosea Easton. “An Address: Delivered before the Coloured Population, of Providence, Rhode Island on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 27, 1828.” In To Heal the Scourge of Prejudice: The Life and Writings of Hosea Easton, edited by George R. Price and James Brewer Stewart. Amherst, Mass.: University of Massachusetts Press, 1999. » Read (requires 4×4 login)
Secondary Source
Pryor, Elizabeth Stordeur. “The Etymology of Nigger.” Journal of the Early Republic 36, no. 2 (Summer 2016): 203–45. » Read

12. Labor, Capital, and American Entrepreneurship

Primary Source
Junius [Colton, Calvin]. “Labor and Capital.” In The Junius Tracts, 97–112. New York : Greeley & McElrath, 1844. » Read Note: Go to page 97
Secondary Source
Tucker, Barbara M., and Kenneth H. Tucker Jr. “The Limits of Homo Economicus: An Appraisal of Early American Entrepreneurship.” Journal of the Early Republic 24, no. 2 (July 1, 2004): 208–18. » Read

13. The Mexican-American War

Primary Source
Clay, Henry. Speech of Henry Clay, at the Lexington Mass Meeting, 13th November, 1847 : Together with the Resolutions Adopted on That Occasion : Clay, Henry, 1777-1852. New York: Printed by G.F. Nesbitt, 1847. » Read
Secondary Source
Graebner, Norman A. “Lessons of the Mexican War.” Pacific Historical Review 47, no. 3 (August 1, 1978): 325–42. » Read

14. Women’s Rights and Republican Ideals

Primary Source 
“Declaration of Sentiments, 1848.” National Park Service. » Read
Secondary Source
Wellman, Judith. “Women’s Rights, Republicanism, and Revolutionary Rhetoric in Antebellum New York State.” New York History 69, no. 3 (July 1, 1988): 352–84. » Read

15. The Brutal Assault of Charles Sumner on the Senate Floor

Primary Source
Sumner, Charles. “Crime Against Kansas, 1856.” Digital History. » Read
Secondary Source 
Sinha, Manisha. “The Caning of Charles Sumner: Slavery, Race, and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War.” Journal of the Early Republic 23, no. 2 (July 1, 2003): 233–62. » Read

16. Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Primary Source 
“Lincoln-Douglas, Second Debate in Freeport, Illinois, 1858.” National Park Service. » Read
Secondary Source 
Guelzo, Allen C. “Houses Divided: Lincoln, Douglas, and the Political Landscape of 1858.” The Journal of American History 94, no. 2 (September 1, 2007): 391–417. » Read

17. Civil War Soldiers and Family Responsibilities

Primary Source 
“Letters of the Dedrick Family, 1861-1863.” Letters & Diaries. Augusta County, Virginia. The Valley of the Shadow. University of Virginia Library. » Read
Secondary Source 
Marten, James. “Fatherhood in the Confederacy: Southern Soldiers and Their Children.” The Journal of Southern History 63, no. 2 (May 1, 1997): 269–92. » Read

18. Prisoners in the Civil War

Primary Source 
“Wartime Letters from Camp Chase, 1862.” Augusta County, Virginia. The Valley of the Shadow. University of Virginia Library. » Read
Secondary Source
Miller, Robert E. “War Within Walls: Camp Chase and the Search for Administrative Reform.” Ohio History 96 (August 1987): 33–56. » Read

19. Women and the Civil War Home Front

Primary Source 
Cormany, Rachel. “Diary of Rachel Cormany (1863).” Franklin County, Pennsylvania, Personal Papers. The Valley of the Shadow. University of Virginia Library. » Read
Secondary Source
Rodgers, Thomas E. “Hoosier Women and the Civil War Home Front.” Indiana Magazine of History 97, no. 2 (June 1, 2001): 105–28. » Read

20. Black Soldiers in the Civil War

Primary Source 
“Augusta County: John Quincy Adams Nadenbousch to Hester J. Nadenbousch, April 20, 1864.” Valley Personal Papers. Valley of the Shadow. University of Virginia Library. » Read
Secondary Source 
Urwin, Gregory J. W. “‘We Cannot Treat Negroes … as Prisoners of War’: Racial Atrocities and Reprisals in Civil War Arkansas.” Civil War History 42, no. 3 (1996): 193–210. » Read

21. Free Blacks in Indian Territory

Primary Source 
“Interview with Charles Moore Brown, June 14, 1937.” Indian Pioneer Papers. Western History Collections. University of Oklahoma Libraries. » Read  Note: Other accounts available through the digital collection, Indian Pioneer History from the Western History Collections (search the term Freedmen).
Secondary Source 
Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr., and Mary Ann Littlefield. “The Beams Family: Free Blacks in Indian Territory.” The Journal of Negro History 61, no. 1 (January 1, 1976): 16–35. » Read

22. Lincoln and the Ethics of Emancipation

Primary Source 
“Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863 (Transcript).” Featured Documents, National Archives. » Read
Secondary Source 
Ross, Dorothy. “Lincoln and the Ethics of Emancipation: Universalism, Nationalism, Exceptionalism.” The Journal of American History 96, no. 2 (September 1, 2009): 379–99. » Read