1. Andrew Jackson’s Vision for America

Primary Source 
Two letters by Andrew Jackson:
A) Andrew Jackson’s Letter to John Sevier, October 9, 1803 » Read (requires password)
B) “Andrew Jackson to ‘Brave Tennesseans’” in Whig Extra, 1813 » Read

Secondary Source
Fred Anderson and Andrew Cayton, “Jackson’s Vision: Creating a Populist Empire,” The Dominion of War (Chapter 5) » Read (requires password)

2. Slavery and the Law

Primary Source 
State v. Mann, 13 N.C. 263 (1829) » Read

Secondary Source 
Article: Mark Tushnet, “State v. Mann: Why Ruffin?” North Carolina Law Review » Read

3. The Bank War

Primary Source 
Andrew Jackson, Bank Veto, July 10, 1832 » Read

Secondary Source 
Major L. Wilson, “The Country versus the Court: A Republican Consensus and Party Debate in the Bank War,” Journal of the Early Republic » Read

4. Conflicts in Sovereignty: Tribal, State, and Federal Government

Primary Source 
Samuel A. Worcester, Plaintiff in Error v. The State of Georgia » Read

Secondary Source 
Edwin A. Miles, “After John Marshall’s Decision: ‘Worcester v. Georgia’ and the Nullification Crisis,” The Journal of Southern History » Read

5. Andrew Jackson’s Justification for Indian Removal

Primary Source 
State of the Union Address, Andrew Jackson, December 7, 1830 » Read

Secondary Source 
Mark R. Scherer, “’Now Let Him Enforce It’: Exploring the Myth of Andrew Jackson’s Response to Worcester vs. Georgia (1832),” The Chronicles of Oklahoma » Read (requires password)

6. Indian Removal and Anti-removal Campaigns

Primary Source 
Petition Texts: The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History with Documents » Read (requires password)

Secondary Source 
Tiya Miles, “‘Circular Reasoning’: Recentering Cherokee Women in the Antiremoval Campaigns,” American Quarterly » Read

7. Slavery and Abolitionism

Primary Source 
A) John C. Calhoun, “Slavery as a Positive Good,” » Read
B) Speech: U.S. Senate, Congressional Globe, 24th Congress, 2nd Sess (Feb. 6, 1837),
 » Read Note: Choose “December 5, 1836 to March 3, 1837” and go to image 157.

Secondary Source 
Lacy Ford, “Reconfiguring the Old South: ‘Solving’ the Problem of Slavery, 1787-1838,” The Journal of American History » Read

8. The Exercise of Control Over Enslaved Women

Primary Source
“Mary Reynolds.” WPA Slave Narrative Project, Texas Narratives » Read

Secondary Source
Stephanie M. H. Camp, “The Pleasures of Resistance: Enslaved Women and Body Politics in the Plantation South, 1830-1861,” The Journal of Southern History » Read

9. A Look Inside the Slave Trade

Primary Source 
Spirituals
A) Many Thousands Gone” » Read
B) Been in the Storm So Long” » Read Note: see page 12 of PDF

Secondary Source 
Walter Johnson, “The Chattel Principle,” Soul By Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market (Chapter 1) » Read

10. Working Conditions for Women in Factories

Primary Source 
“The First Official Investigation of Labor Conditions, 1845” » Read Note: Begins on page 133

Secondary Source 
Thomas Dublin, “Women, Work, and the Family: Female Operatives in the Lowell Mills, 1830-1860,” Feminist Studies » Read

11. Labor, Capital, and American Entrepreneurship

Primary Source 
Junius [Calvin Colton], “Labor and Capital,” » Read Note: Go to page 97

Secondary Source 
Barbara M. Tucker and Kenneth H. Tucker, Jr., “The Limits of Homo Economicus: An Appraisal of Early American Entrepreneurship,” Journal of the Early Republic » Read

12. The Mexican-American War

Primary Source 
Henry Clay, Lexington Address, 1847 » Read

Secondary Source 
Norman A. Graebner, “Lessons of the Mexican War,” Pacific Historical Review » Read

13. Women’s Rights and Republican Ideals

Primary Source 
Declaration of Sentiments, 1848 » Read

Secondary Source 
Judith Wellman, “Women’s Rights, Republicanism, and Revolutionary Rhetoric in Antebellum New York State,” New York History » Read

14. The Brutal Assault of Charles Sumner on the Senate Floor

Primary Source 
Charles Sumner, “The Crime against Kansas,” » Read

Secondary Source 
Manisha Sinha, “The Caning of Charles Sumner: Slavery, Race, and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War,” Journal of the Early Republic » Read

15. Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Primary Source 
Freeport Debate, Lincoln-Douglas Debates, 1858 » Read

Secondary Source 
Allen C. Guezlo, “Houses Divided: Lincoln, Douglas, and the Political Landscape of 1858,” The Journal of American History » Read

16. Civil War Soldiers and Family Responsibilities

Primary Source 
Correspondence between the Dedricks » Read

Secondary Source 
James Martin, “Fatherhood in the Confederacy: Southern soldiers and their children,” The Journal of Southern History » Read

17. Prisoners in the Civil War

Primary Source 
Camp Chase wartime letters » Read

Secondary Source 
Robert Earnest Miller, “War within Walls: Camp Chase and the Search for Administrative Reform,” Ohio History Journal » Read

18. Women and the Civil War Home Front

Primary Source 
Franklin County: Diary of Rachel Cormany (1863) » Read

Secondary Source 
Thomas E. Rodgers, “Hoosier Women and the Civil War Home Front,” Indiana Magazine of History » Read

19. Black Soldiers in the Civil War

Primary Source 
Augusta County: John Quincy Adams Nadenbousch to Hester J. Nadenbousch, April 20, 1864 » Read

Secondary Source 
Gregory J. Urwin, “’We cannot treat negroes…as prisoners of war’: Racial Atrocities and Reprisals in Civil War Arkansas,” Civil War History » Read

20. Free Blacks in Indian Territory

Primary Source 
“Interview with Charles Moore Brown” » Read
Note: Other accounts available through the digital collection, Indian Pioneer History from the Western History Collections (search the term Freedmen).

Secondary Source 
M. A. Littlefield, “Beams Family: Free Blacks in Indian Territory,” The Journal of Negro History » Read

21. Lincoln and the Ethics of Emancipation

Primary Source 
Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863 » Read

Secondary Source 
Dorothy Ross, “Lincoln and the Ethics of Emancipation: Universalism, Nationalism, Exceptionalism,” The Journal of American History » Read

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