Notes on links within this page:

  • Many links go directly to the source document.
  • Other links go to a database or journal through OU Libraries’ homepage and may require a login with your OUNetID (4×4), particularly if you are off-campus.
  • Some links go to the library’s electronic reserve system, ExLibris Leganto, and require a login with your OUNetID (4×4).
  • Report link problems to lscrivener@ou.edu.

If you need to find additional resources see the library research guide.

  • Reconstruction

    1. Reconstruction and Voting Rights

    Primary Source
    Douglass, Frederick. “What the Black Man Wants, April 1865.” Speech reprinted in Dissent in America, 173–75. New York: Pearson Longman, 2008. » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    Secondary Source
    Williams, Patrick G. “Suffrage Restriction in Post-Reconstruction Texas: Urban Politics and the Specter of the Commune.” The Journal of Southern History 68, no. 1 (February 1, 2002): 31–64. » Read
    -OR-
    Foner, Eric. “Rights and the Constitution in Black Life during the Civil War and Reconstruction.” The Journal of American History 74, no. 3 (1987): 863–83 » Read

    2.  Reconstruction and Reconciliation

    Primary Source
    Douglass, Frederick. “What the Black Man Wants, April 1865.” Speech reprinted in Dissent in America, 173–75. New York: Pearson Longman, 2008. » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    Secondary Source
    Blight, David W. “Reconstruction and Reconciliation.” In Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, 98–139. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2001. » Read
    -OR-
    Du Bois, W. E. B. “Reconstruction and Its Benefits.” The American Historical Review 15, no. 4 (1910): 781–99 » Read

    3. Reconstruction in the American West: The Washita River Massacre

    Primary Source
    “F.F. Ross to Mr. Chester Lamb, June 19, 1937.” Indian Pioneer Papers. Western History Collections. University of Oklahoma Libraries. » Read
    Secondary Source
    Greene, Jerome. “Washita.” In Washita: The U.S. Army and the Southern Cheyennes, 1867-1869, 116–61. Norman, Okla.: University of Oklahoma Press, 2004. » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    4. African-American Identity in the New South

    Primary Source
    DuBois, W.E.B. “Niagara Movement Speech, 1905.” TeachingAmericanHistory.org  » Read

    Washington, Booker T. “Atlanta Compromise Speech, September 18, 1895.” History Matters. George Mason University. » Read
    Secondary Source
    Capeci, Dominic J., and Jack C. Knight. “Reckoning with Violence: W. E. B. Du Bois and the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot.” The Journal of Southern History 62, no. 4 (November 1, 1996): 727–66. » Read

    5. Racial Violence in the New South

    Primary Source
    Litwack, Leon. “Hellhounds.” In Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America, edited by James Allen, 8–37+. Santa Fe, N.M.: Twin Palms Pub., 2000. » View (requires 4×4 login)  Note:  Primary sources are graphic postcards of lynchings at the end of the chapter. The full book is on reserve in the library. Request call number: HV 6459 .W57 2000.
    Secondary Source
    Litwack, Leon. “Hellhounds.” In Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America, edited by James Allen, 8–37+. Santa Fe, N.M.: Twin Palms Pub., 2000. » Read (requires 4×4 login) Note: The full book is on reserve in the library. Request call number: HV 6459 .W57 2000.
  • The Gilded Age

    1. Conservatism and Liberalism in the Gilded Age

    Primary Source
    William Graham Sumner. “That It Is Not Wicked to Be Rich…” Abridged from What the Social Classes Owe to Each Other, 43–57. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1883. » Read 
    Ward, Lester F. “Mind as a Social Factor (Abridged).” Mind 9, no. 36 (1884): 563–73. » Read
    Secondary Source
    Witt, John Fabian. “Crippled Workingmen, Destitute Widows, and the Crisis of Free Labor.” In The Accidental Republic: Crippled Workingmen, Destitute Widows, and the Remaking of American Law, 22–42. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2004. » Read

    2. Western Settlement in the Gilded Age: The Oklahoma Land Runs

    Primary Source
    “Interview with William Powell, May 25, 1937.” Indian Pioneer Papers. Western History Collections. University of Oklahoma Libraries. » Read
    Secondary Source
    Baird, W. David, and Danney Goble. “Promised Land: Oklahoma Territory.” In Oklahoma, A History. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2008. » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    3. The Allotment of Indian Lands in the Gilded Age

    Primary Source 
    “The Creek Ultimatum of Isparhecher.” And “The Cherokees Reply to Isparhecher.” In Indian Chieftain, November 1897. Isparhecher Collection. Native American Manuscripts Collection. Western History Collections. University of Oklahoma Libraries. » Read
    Secondary Source
    Chang, David A. “Raw Country and Jeffersonian Dreams (Part of This Chapter).” In The Color of the Land: Race, Nation, and the Politics of Landownership in Oklahoma, 1832-1929, 79–89. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010. » Read (requires 4×4 login)

     

  • Populism

    1. Populist Factions

    Primary Source
    “National Peoples’ Party Platform (Omaha Platform).” In A Populist Reader: Selections from the Works of American Populist Leaders, 1st ed., 90–96. New York: Harper & Row, 1966. » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    Secondary Source 
    Frank, Thomas. “Leviathan with Tentacles of Steel: Railroads in the Minds of Kansas Populists.” The Western Historical Quarterly 20, no. 1 (February 1, 1989): 37–54.  » Read

    2. Western Regionalism

    Primary Source
    Turner, Frederick Jackson. “Significance of the Frontier in American History.” In The Frontier in American History, 1–38. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1921. » Read
    Secondary Source 
    Book Section: White, Richard. “Frederick Jackson Turner and Buffalo Bill Cody,” The Frontier in American Culture, pp. 7-66. » Read  Note: The physical book is on reserve at the library. Call Number: F 596 .W562 1994.
  • Progessive Era

    1. The March of the Mill Children

    Primary Source
    Mother Jones. “March of the Mill Children, 1903.” In Dissent in America: Voices That Shaped a Nation, edited by Ralph F. Young, 223–27. New York: Pearson Longman, 2008. » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    Secondary Source 
    Gorn, Elliott J. “Children’s Crusade.” In Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America, 117–41. New York: Hill and Wang, 2001. » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    2. Hull House and the Peace Movement

    Primary Source 
    Addams, Jane. “The Subjective Necessity for Social Settlements.” Originally in Philanthropy and Social Progress. New York: Thomas Y. Cromwell, 1893. Infed. YMCA George Williams College. » Read
    Secondary Source 
    Schott, Linda. “Jane Addams and William James on Alternatives to War.” Journal of the History of Ideas 54, no. 2 (April 1, 1993): 241–54 » Read

    3. Progressive Era Conservation

    Primary Source 
    Roosevelt, Theodore. “Publicizing Conservation at the White House (1908).” In American Environment: Readings in the History of Conservation, edited by Roderick Frazier Nash, 84–89. Reading, Mass, Addison-Wesley PubCo, 1968. » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    Secondary Source
    Armitage, Kevin C. “Bird Day for Kids: Progressive Conservation in Theory and Practice.” Environmental History 12, no. 3 (July 1, 2007): 528–51. » Read
    Rome, Adam. “‘Political Hermaphrodites’: Gender and Environmental Reform in Progressive America.” Environmental History 11, no. 3 (July 1, 2006): 440–63. » Read

    4. Urban Reform

    Primary Source 
    Riis, Jacob A.. “[Chapters I, IV, V, IX, X, XIII].” In How the Other Half Lives : Studies among the Tenements of New York. New York: Dover, 1971.   » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    Secondary Source 
    O’Donnell, Edward T. “Pictures vs. Words? Public History, Tolerance, and the Challenge of Jacob Riis.” The Public Historian 26, no. 3 (August 1, 2004): 7–26. » Read
    Zipp, Samuel. “The Roots and Routes of Urban Renewal.” Journal of Urban History 39, no. 3 (May 1, 2013): 366–91. » Read

    5. Immigration and Xenophobia

    Primary Source 
    “National Origins Act Text, 1924.” Laws.com » Read
    Secondary Source 
    Ngai, Mae M. “The Architecture of Race in American Immigration Law: A Reexamination of the Immigration Act of 1924.” The Journal of American History 86, no. 1 (June 1, 1999): 67–92. » Read
  • World War I

    1. World War I and Trans-National America

    Primary Source
    Bourne, Randolph. “Trans-National America.” Atlantic Monthly. 118 (July 1916): 86–97. » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    Secondary Source 
    A) Higham, John. “American Immigration Policy in Historical Perspective.” Law and Contemporary Problems 21, no. 2 (April 1, 1956): 213–35. » Read

    B) Ngai, Mae M. “Nationalism, Immigration Control, and the Ethnoracial Remapping of America in the 1920S.” OAH Magazine of History 21, no. 3 (July 1, 2007): 11–15. » Read

    2. World War I and American Governance

    Primary Source 
    “U.S. Espionage Act, 15 June 1917.” Primary Documents. firstworldwar.com » Read
    Secondary Source 
    Kennedy, David M. “Prologue: Spring, 1917.” In Over Here: The First World War and American Society. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. » Read

    3. American Indians and World War I

    Primary Source 
    A) “Indian Is Model Doughboy: Choctaw Hero Chosen to Pose for French Artist’s Soldier Painting.” The Washington Post (1877-1922). December 18, 1919. » Read
    B) “Interview with Joe Howard, July 22, 1937.” Indian Pioneer Papers. Western History Collections. University of Oklahoma Libraries. » Read
    Secondary Source 
    Barsh, Russel Lawrence. “American Indians in the Great War.” Ethnohistory 38, no. 3 (July 1, 1991): 276–303. » Read

    4. World War I Propaganda

    Primary Source
    Cornebise, Alfred E. “[Committee on Public Information. Four-Minute Men Speeches – Samples].” In War As Advertised: The Four Minute Men and America’s Crusade, 1917-1918. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1984. » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    Secondary Source 
    Bishop, M. Guy. “‘Strong Voices and 100 Per Cent Patriotism’: The Four-Minute Men of Los Angeles County, 1917-1918.” Southern California Quarterly 77, no. 3 (October 1, 1995): 199–214. » Read
  • The 1920s

    1. Herbert Hoover’s Vision for America

    Primary Source 
    Book Chapter: Herbert Hoover, “American Individualism,” American Individualism (Chapter 1) » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Ellis Hawley, “Hoover, the Commerce Secretariat, and the Vision of an ‘Associative State,’ 1921-1928,” The Journal of American History » Read

    2. Harlem Renaissance

    Primary Source 
    Poem: Langston Hughes, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers”  » Read
    Poem: Claude McKay, “If We Must Die” (1917) » Read
    Poem: Countee Cullen, “The Black Christ” (1929) » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Book Chapter: George Hutchinson, “Staging a Renaissance,” Harlem Renaissance in Black and White (Chapter 13) » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    3. The Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s

    Primary Source 
    Article: Hiram Wesley Evans, “The Klan’s Fight for Americanism,”  » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Book Chapter: Kathleen M. Blee, “The Ku Klux Klan in Indiana,” Social Fabric: American Life from the Civil War to the Present » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    4. The 1920s Ku Klux Klan at the University of Oklahoma

    Primary Source 
    Letter: Edwin DeBarr, “Reminiscence, March 1935,” Lida White Collection, Box 9, Folder 2, Western History Collections, University of Oklahoma » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Article: David W. Levy, “The Rise and Fall and Rise and Fall of Edwin ‘Daddy’ DeBarr,” The Chronicles of Oklahoma » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    5. The Oklahoma Legislature’s Battle with the Ku Klux Klan

    Primary Source 
    Memo: “Memo from Mrs. James A. Wilson, Realm Commander, to All Grand Officers, Regents, Excellent Commanders and Klanswomen, regarding chartering of Klanhaven,” Ku Klux Klan Women’s Organization Collection, Western History Collections, University of Oklahoma » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Sheldon Neuringer, “Governor Walton’s War on the Ku Klux Klan: An Episode in Oklahoma History 1923 to 1924” The Chronicles of Oklahoma » Read (requires 4×4 login)

     

  • The Great Depression

    1. The Great Depression and the New Deal

    Primary Source 
    Speech: Franklin Roosevelt, “Inaugural Address,” March 4, 1933 » Read
    Speech: Franklin Roosevelt, “Fireside Chat on the Banking Crisis,” March 12, 1933 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Christina Romer, “What Ended the Great Depression?” The Journal of Economic History » Read

    2. The Nation Confronts the Great Depression

    Primary Source 
    Book Chapter: John Steinbeck, Chapter 2, The Harvest Gypsies » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Book Chapter: Caroline Bird, “The Nation Confronts the Great Depression,” Social Fabric: American Life from the Civil War to the Present » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    3. John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath in Oklahoma

    Primary Source 
    Article: “Guymon Prepares to Shame Grapes,” The Daily Oklahoman » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Martin Staples Shockley, “The Reception of the Grapes of Wrath in Oklahoma,” American Literature » Read

    4. The Dust Bowl

    Primary Source (Images: FSA photos on the Dust Bowl at Library of Congress)
    Migrant Mother by Dorothea Lange, 1936 » View
    Dust Bowl Refugee from Chickasaw County, Oklahoma by Dorothea Lange, 1934 » View
    One of the Pioneer Women of the Oklahoma Panhandle by Arthur Rothstein, 1936 » View
    Dust Bowl Farmer Raising Fence, Cimarron County, OK by Arthur Rothstein, 1936 » View
    Abandoned Farm, Dust Bowl OK by Rothstein, 1936 » View
    Squatters along Highway near Bakersfield by Lange, 1935 » View
    Oklahoma Dust Bowl Refugees, San Fernando, CA by Lange, 1935 » View
    Home of Dust Bowl Refugee, Imperial Valley by Lange, 1937 » View
    Farmer and Sons walking in face of dust storm, Cimarron County by Rothstein, 1936 » View

    Secondary Source 
    Book Chapter: Donald Worster, “Hard Times in the Panhandle,” Dust Bowl: The Southern Plain in the 1930s. (Chapter 8) » Read (requires 4×4 login)

     

  • World War II

    1. World War II: What Our Boys Are Fighting For

    Primary Source 
    Speech: Henry A. Wallace, “Century of the Common Man,”  » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Robert B. Westbrook, “’I Want a Girl, Just Like the Girl that Married Harry James’: American Women and the Problem of Political Obligation in World War II,” American Quarterly » Read

    2. World War II and the Home Front

    Primary Source 
    Executive Order: Executive Order 9066: Resulting in the Relocation of Japanese, February 19, 1942 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Book Chapter: David M. Kennedy, “The Cauldron of the Home Front,” Freedom From Fear. Part Two, The American People in World War II (Chapter 8) » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    3. World War II in Oklahoma

    Primary Source 
    A) Article: “Lynchers Hanged,” The Washington Post » Read
    B) Article: “Prisoner from Oklahoma is Captured in France,” New York Times » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Richard S. Warner, “Barbed Wire and Nazilagers: POW Camps in Oklahoma,” The Chronicles of Oklahoma » Read (requires 4×4 login)

     

  • The Cold War

    1. Asymmetric Conflict and the Cold War

    Primary Source
    Speech: Harry S. Truman, “President Harry S. Truman’s Address Before a Joint Session of Congress, March 12, 1947” » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Andrew Mack, “Why Big Nations Lose Small Wars,” World Politics » Read

    2. The Cold War at Home, Part I

    Primary Source 
    Speech: Margaret Chase Smith, Declaration of Conscience, 1950 » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Book Chapter: David Halberstam, Chapter 3, The Fifties » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    3. The Cold War at Home, Part II

    Primary Source 
    Book Chapter: Paul Robeson, “I Take My Stand,” Here I Stand » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Barbara J. Beeching, “Paul Robeson and the Black Press: The 1950 Passport Controversy.” The Journal of African American History » Read

    4. Cold War Censorship in Oklahoma

    Primary Source 
    Letter: “Letter from E.R. Christopher to Tom, August 17, 1950,” E.R. Christopher Collection, Box 13, Folder 2. Western History Collections, University of Oklahoma » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Louise S. Robbins, “Racism and Censorship in Cold War Oklahoma: The Case of Ruth W. Brown and the Bartlesville Public Library,” The Southwestern Historical Quarterly » Read

  • Civil Rights

    1. Civil Rights and the Cold War

    Primary Source 
    Court Ruling: Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Decision » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Article:  Mary Dzudziak, “Brown as a Cold War Case,” Journal of American History » Read

    2. Segregation at the University of Oklahoma

    Primary Source 
    A) Article: “Negro to Apply Again for Entry as OU Student,” The Daily Oklahoman » Read
    B) Article: “Class Railings to Segregate Negroes at OU,” The Daily Oklahoman » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Article: John T. Hubbell, “The Desegregation of the University of Oklahoma,” The Journal of Negro History » Read

    3. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

    Primary Source 
    Letter: Martin Luther King, Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail. » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Joseph Kip Kosek, “Richard Gregg, Mohandas Gandhi, and the Strategy of Nonviolence,” The Journal of American History » Read

    4. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the American Memory

    Primary Source 
    A) Video: Martin Luther King, Jr., “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop,” » Read
    B) Speech: Full Text of King’s Speech » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Book Chapter: David Chappell, “Legalizing the Legacy,” Waking from the Dream: the Struggle for Civil Rights in the Shadow of Martin Luther King (Chapter 4) » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    5. Mass Incarceration in Modern America

    Primary Source 
    Legislation: California’s “Three Strikes” Law (March 1994) and Prop. 184 (November 1994).
    » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Heather Thompson, “Why Mass Incarceration Matters: Rethinking Crisis, Decline, and Transformation in Postwar American History,” The Journal of American History » Read
    -OR-
    Book excerpt: Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (excerpt from introduction) » Read

  • Vietnam

    Primary:
    “Telegram From the Embassy in Vietnam to the Department of State,” Saigon, January 13, 1968 » Read
    Broadcast: Walter Cronkite’s “We Are Mired in Stalemate,”  February 27, 1968 » Read

    Secondary:
    Article: Chester J. Pach, “TV’s 1968: War, Politics, and Violence on the Network Evening News” South Central Review » Read

  • The 1970s

    1. Richard Nixon

    Primary:
    Speech: Richard Nixon: “Address to the Nation About the Watergate Investigations April 30, 1973” » Read

    Secondary:
    Article: “The Watergate Story” published in The Washington Post
    Part 1 » Read
    Part 2 » Read
    Part 3 » Read
    Part 4 » Read

    2. Post War Environmentalism

    Primary Source
    Book Chapter: Rachel Carson, “And No Birds Sing,” Silent Spring (Chapter 8) » Read (requires 4×4 login)

    Secondary Source
    Article: Adam Rome, “The Genius of Earth Day,” Environmental History » Read

    3. Environmental Justice

    Primary Source
    Article: Lois Gibbs, “‘It Does Affect You’: Women at Love Canal and Three Mile Island,” Radical America 17, no. 2-3 (June 1983): 29-36  » Read (scroll to page 29)

    Secondary Source
    A) Book Chapter: Elizabeth Blum, “Gender at Love Canal,” Love Canal Revisited (Chapter 2) » Read (requires 4×4 login)
    B) Book Chapter: Elizabeth Blum, “Race at Love Canal,” Love Canal Revisited, (Chapter 3)  » Read (requires 4×4 login)

  • The Reagan Era

    Primary:
    Speech: “The Evil Empire,” President Reagan’s Speech to the House of Commons, June 8, 1982. » Read

    Secondary:
    Article: Daniel Deudney and G. John Ikenberry, “Who Won the Cold War?”  Foreign Policy (Summer 1992) » Read