Please Note: Some sources may link directly to the document while others may lead you to the OU Libraries page, where you’ll need your 4×4 to log in, or a special password from your instructor.  Once there, be sure to find your topic and document from the list on that page.

Need Help Finding More Sources? “Find Additional Library Resources”

  • Colonial America

    1. Food and Authority in Colonial America

    Primary Source
    Captain John Smith,”The generall historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles: with the names of the adventurers, planters, and governours from their…”  » Read
    Note: Once you access the source, click on the title and read from page 105-106.

    Secondary Source
    Michael A. Lacombe, “A continuall and dayly Table for Gentlemen of fashion’: Humanism, Food, and Authority at Jamestown, 1607-1609,” American Historical Review » Read

    2. Divine Judgement

    Primary Source
    John Rolfe to Sir Thomas Dale regarding marriage to Pocahontas, » Read

    Secondary Source
    Edward L. Bond, “Source of Knowledge, Source of Power: The Supernatural World of English Virginia, 1607-1624,” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography » Read

    3. The Labor Problem in Colonial Settlements

    Primary Source
    Richard Frethorne to his Mother and Father, on indentured servitude, » Read

    Secondary Source
    Edmund S. Morgan, “The Labor Problem at Jamestown, 1607-18,” American Historical Review » Read

    4. Bacon’s Rebellion

    Primary Source
    Nathaniel Bacon, “Declaration of the People,” » Read
    Note: Go to page 59

    Secondary Source
    Brent Tarter, “Bacon’s Rebellion, the Grievances of the People, and the Political Culture of Seventeenth-Century Virginia,” The Virginia Magazine of History & Biography » Read

    5. Class and the Commonalty in Seventeenth-Century Virginia

    Primary Source
    “Causes of Discontent in Virginia, 1676,” » Read

    Secondary Source
    Peter Thompson, “The Thief, the Householder, and the Commons: Languages of Class in Seventeenth-Century Virginia,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    6. Slavery and Racism in Seventeenth-Century Virginia

    Primary Source
    Seventeenth-Century Virginia Slave Laws » Read

    Secondary Source
    Alden Vaughan, “The Origins Debate: Slavery and Racism in Seventeenth-Century Virginia,” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography » Read

    7. First Contact Narratives and the Deification of Europeans

    Primary Source
    John Heckewelder, “Indian Tradition of the First Arrival of the Dutch at Manhattan Island, now New-York.”  » Read

    Secondary Source
    Evan Haefeli, “On First Contact and Apotheosis: Manitou and Men in North America,” Ethnohistory » Read

    8. Defining Puritanism and Its Role in New England

    Primary Source
    John Winthrop’s “Christian Experience” » Read (requires password)

    Secondary Source
    Michael P. Winship, “Were There Any Puritans in New England?” The New England Quarterly » Read

    9. Between Two Worlds: Cultural Contact in the New World

    Primary Source
    Mary Rowlandson, The Sovereignty and Goodness of God, Together with the Faithfulness of His Promises Displayed, Being a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, pp. 8-41 » Read

    Secondary Source
    Jill Lepore, “Dead Men Tell No Tales: John Sassamon Between Two Cultures,” American Quarterly » Read

    10. Metacom’s War

    Primary Source
    Metacom Relates Complaints about the English Colonists Settlers, 1675 » Read

    Secondary Source
    Jenny Hale Pulsipher, “Massacre at Hurtleberry Hill: Christian Indians and English Authority in Metacom’s War,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    11. Indian Borders and Sovereignty

    Primary Source
    Two Eighteenth-Century Indian Maps:
    A) Catawba, 1721 » Read
    B) Chickasaw, 1737 » Read (requires password) (See “Nations Amies et Ennemies des Tchicachas”)

    Secondary Source
    Juliana Barr, “Geographies of Power: Mapping Indian Borders in the ‘Borderlands’ of the Early Southwest,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    12. Runaway Slave Advertisements

    Primary Source
    Runaway Slave Advertisements » Read

    Secondary Source
    David Waldstreicher, “Reading the Runaways: Self-Fashioning, Print Culture, and Confidence in Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century Mid-Atlantic,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    13. The Wild Foods of North America

    Primary Source
    John Lawson, A New Voyage to Carolina; Containing the Exact Description and Natural History of That Country: Together with the Present State Thereof. And A Journal of a Thousand Miles, Travel’d Thro’ Several Nations of Indians. Giving a Particular Account of Their Customs, Manners, &c. » Read

    Secondary Source
    Shannon Lee Dawdy, “A Wild Taste’: Food and Colonialism in Eighteenth-Century Louisiana,” Ethnohistory » Read

    14. The First Great Awakening: Christian Revivalism in the Colonies

    Primary Source
    “George Whitefield in Middletown,” in Michael J. Crawford, “The Spiritual Travels of Nathan Cole,” » Read (Go to page 92)
    Note: This document is part of a larger set of documents with an introduction that appeared as Michael J. Crawford, “The Spiritual Travels of Nathan Cole,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser., 33 (Jan. 1976): 89-126.

    Secondary Source
    Frank Lambert, “‘Pedlar in Divinity’: George Whitefield and the Great Awakening, 1737-1745,” The Journal of American History »Read

    15. Massacres of Native Peoples

    Primary Source
    Benjamin Franklin, A Narrative of the Late Massacres, in Lancaster County, of a Number of Indians, Friends of this Province, by Persons Unknown. With Some Observations on the Same » Read

    Secondary Source
    Elizabeth A. Fenn, “Biological Warfare in Eighteenth-Century North America: Beyond Jeffrey Amherst,” The Journal of American History » Read

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  • Revolutionary America

    1. The Working Class in Revolutionary America

    Primary Source
    Brutus, “To the Free and Loyal Inhabitants of the City of New York,” » Read

    Secondary Source
    Alfred F. Young, George Robert Twelves. “A Boston Shoemaker and the Memory of the American Revolution,” The William and Mary Quarterly  » Read

    2. The Promise of Freedom: The Role of Slavery in Revolutionary Virginia

    Primary Source
    Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation, 1775. » Read

    Secondary Source
    Woody Holton, “’Rebel against Rebel’: Enslaved Virginians and the Coming of the American Revolution,” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography » Read

    3. A Rhetorical Analysis of Thomas Paine’s Common Sense

    Primary Source 
    Thomas Paine Common Sense, (Introduction, On the Origin and Design of Government in General . . . , Of Monarchy and Hereditary Succession) » Read

    Secondary Source
    Robert A. Ferguson, “The Commonalities of Common Sense,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    4. Colonial Insurgent and the American Cause

    Primary Source 
    The Declaration of Independence » Read

    Secondary Source
    T. H. Breen, “Samuel Thompson’s War: The Career of an American Insurgent,” Revolutionary Founders (Chapter 3) » Read (requires password)

    5. Domesticity and the American Revolution

    Primary Source 
    Letters between John Adams and Abigail Smith Adams:
    A) Letter 1 » Read
    B) Letter 2 » Read

    Secondary Source
    Edith B. Gelles,“Abigail Adams: Domesticity and the American Revolution,” The New England Quarterly » Read

    6. The Economic and Political Origins of the American Constitution

    Primary Source 
    James Madison, “Vices of the Political System” » Read

    Secondary Source
    Woody Holton, “Did Democracy Cause the Recession that Led to the Constitution,” The Journal of American History » Read

    7. Understanding and Analyzing “Federalist No. 10”

    Primary Source 
    James Madison, Federalist 10 » Read

    Secondary Source
    Mark G. Spencer, “Hume and Madison on Faction,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    8. Wives in Post-Revolutionary America

    Primary Source 
    Judith Sargent Murray, “On the Equality of the Sexes” » Read

    Secondary Source
    Jan Lewis, “The Republican Wife: Virtue and Seduction in the Early Republic,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    9. George Washington and the John Jay Treaty

    Primary Source 
    George Washington to the Boston Selectmen on the Jay Treaty » Read

    Secondary Source
    Todd Estes, “The Art of Presidential Leadership: George Washington and the Jay Treaty,” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography » Read

    10. Creating Citizens in a New Republic

    Primary Source 
    Benjamin Rush, “Of the Mode of Education Proper in a Republic” » Read

    Secondary Source
    William Huntting Howell, “A More Perfect Copy: David Rittenhouse and the Reproduction of Republican Virtue,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    11. Jefferson on the Separation of Church and State

    Primary Source 
    Jefferson’s Letter to the Danbury Baptists » Read

    Secondary Source
    Johann N. Neem, “Beyond the Wall: Reinterpreting Jefferson’s Danbury Address,” Journal of the Early Republic » Read

    12. Natural Rights of Women

    Primary Source 
    Anonymous, “Plan for the Emancipation of the Fair Sex,” » Read

    Secondary Source
    Rosemarie Zagarri, “The Rights of Man and Woman in Post-Revolutionary America,” The William and Mary Quarterly » Read

    Find Additional Library Resources

  • The New Nation

    1. Andrew Jackson’s Vision for America

    Primary Source 
    Two letters by Andrew Jackson:
    A) Andrew Jackson’s Letter to John Sevier, October 9, 1803 » Read (requires password)
    B) “Andrew Jackson to ‘Brave Tennesseans’” in Whig Extra, 1813 » Read

    Secondary Source
    Fred Anderson and Andrew Cayton, “Jackson’s Vision: Creating a Populist Empire,” The Dominion of War (Chapter 5) » Read (requires password)

    2. Slavery and the Law

    Primary Source 
    State v. Mann, 13 N.C. 263 (1829) » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Article: Mark Tushnet, “State v. Mann: Why Ruffin?” North Carolina Law Review » Read

    3. The Bank War

    Primary Source 
    Andrew Jackson, Bank Veto, July 10, 1832 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Major L. Wilson, “The Country versus the Court: A Republican Consensus and Party Debate in the Bank War,” Journal of the Early Republic » Read

    4. Conflicts in Sovereignty: Tribal, State, and Federal Government

    Primary Source 
    Samuel A. Worcester, Plaintiff in Error v. The State of Georgia » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Edwin A. Miles, “After John Marshall’s Decision: ‘Worcester v. Georgia’ and the Nullification Crisis,” The Journal of Southern History » Read

    5. Andrew Jackson’s Justification for Indian Removal

    Primary Source 
    State of the Union Address, Andrew Jackson, December 7, 1830 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Mark R. Scherer, “’Now Let Him Enforce It’: Exploring the Myth of Andrew Jackson’s Response to Worcester vs. Georgia (1832),” The Chronicles of Oklahoma » Read (requires password)

    6. Indian Removal and Anti-removal Campaigns

    Primary Source 
    Petition Texts: The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History with Documents » Read (requires password)

    Secondary Source 
    Tiya Miles, “‘Circular Reasoning’: Recentering Cherokee Women in the Antiremoval Campaigns,” American Quarterly » Read

    7. Slavery and Abolitionism

    Primary Source 
    A) John C. Calhoun, “Slavery as a Positive Good,” » Read
    B) Speech: U.S. Senate, Congressional Globe, 24th Congress, 2nd Sess (Feb. 6, 1837),
     » Read Note: Choose “December 5, 1836 to March 3, 1837” and go to image 157.

    Secondary Source 
    Lacy Ford, “Reconfiguring the Old South: ‘Solving’ the Problem of Slavery, 1787-1838,” The Journal of American History » Read

    8. The Exercise of Control Over Enslaved Women

    Primary Source
    “Mary Reynolds.” WPA Slave Narrative Project, Texas Narratives » Read

    Secondary Source
    Stephanie M. H. Camp, “The Pleasures of Resistance: Enslaved Women and Body Politics in the Plantation South, 1830-1861,” The Journal of Southern History » Read

    9. A Look Inside the Slave Trade

    Primary Source 
    Spirituals
    A) Many Thousands Gone” » Read
    B) Been in the Storm So Long” » Read Note: see page 12 of PDF

    Secondary Source 
    Walter Johnson, “The Chattel Principle,” Soul By Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market (Chapter 1) » Read

    10. Working Conditions for Women in Factories

    Primary Source 
    “The First Official Investigation of Labor Conditions, 1845” » Read Note: Begins on page 133

    Secondary Source 
    Thomas Dublin, “Women, Work, and the Family: Female Operatives in the Lowell Mills, 1830-1860,” Feminist Studies » Read

    11. Labor, Capital, and American Entrepreneurship

    Primary Source 
    Junius [Calvin Colton], “Labor and Capital,” » Read Note: Go to page 97

    Secondary Source 
    Barbara M. Tucker and Kenneth H. Tucker, Jr., “The Limits of Homo Economicus: An Appraisal of Early American Entrepreneurship,” Journal of the Early Republic » Read

    12. The Mexican-American War

    Primary Source 
    Henry Clay, Lexington Address, 1847 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Norman A. Graebner, “Lessons of the Mexican War,” Pacific Historical Review » Read

    13. Women’s Rights and Republican Ideals

    Primary Source 
    Declaration of Sentiments, 1848 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Judith Wellman, “Women’s Rights, Republicanism, and Revolutionary Rhetoric in Antebellum New York State,” New York History » Read

    14. The Brutal Assault of Charles Sumner on the Senate Floor

    Primary Source 
    Charles Sumner, “The Crime against Kansas,” » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Manisha Sinha, “The Caning of Charles Sumner: Slavery, Race, and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War,” Journal of the Early Republic » Read

    15. Lincoln-Douglas Debates

    Primary Source 
    Freeport Debate, Lincoln-Douglas Debates, 1858 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Allen C. Guezlo, “Houses Divided: Lincoln, Douglas, and the Political Landscape of 1858,” The Journal of American History » Read

    16. Civil War Soldiers and Family Responsibilities

    Primary Source 
    Correspondence between the Dedricks » Read

    Secondary Source 
    James Martin, “Fatherhood in the Confederacy: Southern soldiers and their children,” The Journal of Southern History » Read

    17. Prisoners in the Civil War

    Primary Source 
    Camp Chase wartime letters » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Robert Earnest Miller, “War within Walls: Camp Chase and the Search for Administrative Reform,” Ohio History Journal » Read

    18. Women and the Civil War Home Front

    Primary Source 
    Franklin County: Diary of Rachel Cormany (1863) » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Thomas E. Rodgers, “Hoosier Women and the Civil War Home Front,” Indiana Magazine of History » Read

    19. Black Soldiers in the Civil War

    Primary Source 
    Augusta County: John Quincy Adams Nadenbousch to Hester J. Nadenbousch, April 20, 1864 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Gregory J. Urwin, “’We cannot treat negroes…as prisoners of war’: Racial Atrocities and Reprisals in Civil War Arkansas,” Civil War History » Read

    20. Free Blacks in Indian Territory

    Primary Source 
    “Interview with Charles Moore Brown” » Read
    Note: Other accounts available through the digital collection, Indian Pioneer History from the Western History Collections (search the term Freedmen).

    Secondary Source 
    M. A. Littlefield, “Beams Family: Free Blacks in Indian Territory,” The Journal of Negro History » Read

    21. Lincoln and the Ethics of Emancipation

    Primary Source 
    Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863 » Read

    Secondary Source 
    Dorothy Ross, “Lincoln and the Ethics of Emancipation: Universalism, Nationalism, Exceptionalism,” The Journal of American History » Read

    Find Additional Library Resources